Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Help Dad Stay Healthy!

In honor of Father’s Day on June 18, GBMC wants to remind men how vital it is to see their primary care physician for the preventive healthcare they need.

A significant amount of published research has shown that, on average, men have higher mortality rates than women for fatal illnesses such as cancer, heart disease, stroke and AIDS. “Men need to make their health a priority. Being healthy requires maintaining a normal body weight, exercising, and not smoking,” says Kevin Ferentz, MD, lead physician for GBMC at Owings Mills.

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, more than 50 percent of men in the U.S. haven't visited their family physician in the past year, and men make half as many doctor visits for disease prevention than women.

“The longer you put off seeing a doctor, the more likely it is that you will have to see a doctor on a regular basis for problems that were preventable,” warns Dr. Ferentz. He recommends that men discuss the following health screenings with their primary care physicians:
  • Blood pressure: Every man age 18 or older should have his blood pressure checked annually. Normal blood pressure is 120/80. If your numbers are higher, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes, medication or monitoring.
  • Cholesterol: Men ages 20 to 35 with a cardiovascular disease risk factor – like smoking or a family history of heart disease - should be screened. After age 35, men should be screened once every 5 years if normal, or more often if levels are elevated.
  • Colon cancer: Men should be screened regularly starting at age 50 or younger, especially if there is a family history of colorectal cancer.
  • Heart disease: According to the CDC, high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking are key risk factors for heart disease. About half of Americans (49 percent) have at least one of these three risk factors.
  • Prostate cancer: Men should discuss prostate screening with their physician.
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Men between the ages of 55-75 should consider this screening if they have a risk factor like smoking.
Along with health screenings, there are several vaccines that men should discuss with their physicians to protect themselves and their loved ones from serious illnesses like flu, shingles, pneumonia, whooping cough and, for men up to age 26, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.

Father’s Day is the perfect time to remind all the men in our families to schedule an annual health review or see a doctor about a health problem. Visit www.mygbmcdoctor.com to find a primary care physician who is right for you.

Tune in! Dr. Ferentz will be featured on WBFF-TV (FOX 45) on Friday, June 16 during the 7am news hour to discuss men’s health issues.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Chicken Fried Cauliflower Rice

Every month, GBMC holds a Facebook Live cooking demonstration featuring healthy recipes from The Sleeved Chef, Michael Salamon. Michael graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and is passionate about “teaching cooking techniques and recipes to pre- and post-operative bariatric patients.” He had a type of bariatric surgery known as a sleeve gastrectomy in September 2016 and enjoys sharing his knowledge of cooking with fellow weight loss patients. Co-hosting the demonstration with him is Jana Wolff, RD, LDN, Director of Nutrition for GBMC’s Comprehensive Obesity Management Program, where Michael was treated.

The recipe is appropriate for bariatric patients, but it is also a great high-protein, low-carb meal for anyone! Please tune in to GBMC’s Facebook page on Tuesday, June 27 at 6pm for another live cooking demonstration with Michael and Jana!

Ingredients

4 oz chicken breast, thinly sliced
1 cup of cauliflower rice
1 yellow onion, small diced
1 carrot, small diced
2 celery stalks, small diced
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 egg
1 tsp sesame oil
1 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce

Instructions

Cauliflower Rice
  1. Cut one head of cauliflower into florets.
  2. Place the florets into a food processor and blend until cauliflower is riced.
  3. Stop processor, remove lid and stir to promote consistent size and texture
  4. Remove cauliflower rice from food processor and reserve

Other Ingredients
  1. Small dice onion, carrots, and celery; place on a plate
  2. Mince ginger and garlic; place on a plate
  3. Butterfly the chicken breast and thinly slice it into 1/4" strips
  4. Place 1 tsp of sesame oil in a cast iron pan on medium heat
  5. Add onion, carrots, celery, ginger and garlic to the pan; season with salt and pepper
  6. Sauté vegetables until tender, about 2 minutes
  7. Place chicken in the pan and season with salt and pepper
  8. Sauté chicken for 3-4 minutes until fully cooked
  9. Add cauliflower rice to pan, season with salt and pepper
  10. Sauté cauliflower rice for 1-2 minutes until tender
  11. Add soy sauce and cook for an additional minute
  12. Slice green onions on a bias and place into pan
  13. Serve immediately in a bowl

Watch the Chicken Fried Cauliflower Rice cookingdemonstration here.

Nutrition Information
Recipe yields 1 serving

Calories: 330
Total Fat: 13g
Saturated Fat: 3g
Cholesterol: 235mg
Sodium: 820mg
Protein: 37g
Carbohydrate: 18g

Recipe courtesy of Michael Salamon, The Sleeved Chef.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Lowdown on Falls

Physical therapist Joe Palmer, PT, DPT, OMPT,
CSCS, CMTPT, of Active Life and Sports
presenting on dizziness, imbalance and falls
at GBMC's Time for Me event
If you’re approaching retirement age, listen up! You may be at a higher risk for falling and injuring yourself. It’s an unfortunate fact of life that people lose strength and flexibility as they age. Activity levels tend to decline and other health issues may affect people’s balance or depth perception. You may not feel much different than you did at 40 or 50, but there are a few precautions you should begin taking in order to keep yourself healthy and safe. Here are some easy things you can do now to prevent a fall with injury:
  • Keep clutter at bay – things like shoes, power cords and small rugs are easy to trip over if you’re not paying attention
  • Make sure your home is well-lit
  • Ensure that staircases have secure railings and non-slip treads
  • Talk to your primary care physician or pharmacist about medications you’re taking, how the drugs interact with each other and side effects they may cause
  • Get your vision checked regularly
  • Consider installing “grab bars” in the restroom and applying non-slip strips to the bottom of your shower/tub
  • Exercise! Any type of activity is helpful, but weight-bearing exercises are known to boost bone and muscle strength
  • Speak with your physician about taking calcium and vitamin D supplements to support bone health
  • Be cautious with alcohol consumption and use of over-the-counter medications
  • Wear shoes that are comfortable and fit properly
  • Can’t reach something you need? Call a family member, friend or neighbor to help you. It’s not an inconvenience – your loved ones don’t want you to get hurt!
If you’ve fallen more than twice in the past year or are fearful of falling, please consult with your primary care physician for more fall prevention strategies specific to your needs. Don’t have a primary care physician? Visit www.mygbmcdoctor.com to find one who is right for you. GBMC recently hosted a health lecture in conjunction with physical therapists at Active Life and Sports on the subject of dizziness, imbalance and falls. Watch the presentation now!

America’s Most Amazing Nurse Is in Our Hospital!

Laura Clary, manager of GBMC's Sexual
Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) &
Domestic Violence Program, with members
of her team following her award celebration
It’s official! Laura Clary, BSN, RN, FNE-A/P, SANE-A, CFN, CPEN, manager of GBMC’s Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) & Domestic Violence Program, is the Prevention magazine and The Doctors "America's Most Amazing Nurse" winner! 

The news was announced during a festive event in GBMC’s Yaggy OB Atrium on Friday, May 12. Prevention magazine and The Doctors TV show joined efforts in November to search the country for America’s Most Amazing Nurse. Each entrant or nominee had to have an active RN license or advanced nursing credential and must have been working in the nursing field at the time of nomination. Laura was nominated by her husband and was then selected over hundreds of applicants and four other finalists because of her compassion, commitment and expert skills as a caregiver.

Under Laura’s leadership, the GBMC SAFE program expanded to not only care for adult victims of sexual assault but also victims of child abuse, human trafficking, intimate partner violence and non-fatal strangulation.

Barbara O'Dair, editor-in-chief of Prevention magazine, said this about Laura: "Her extraordinary work embodies the true spirit of nursing." A devoted and comforting caregiver who advocates for her patients’ best interests, Laura is a shining example of both the nursing profession and of GBMC’s vision.

Congratulations Laura!

Pan-seared Flank Steak Served over Traditional Greek Salad

Every month, GBMC holds a Facebook Live cooking demonstration featuring healthy recipes from The Sleeved Chef, Michael Salamon. Michael graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and is passionate about “teaching cooking techniques and recipes to pre- and post-operative bariatric patients.” He had a type of bariatric surgery known as a sleeve gastrectomy in September 2016 and enjoys sharing his knowledge of cooking with fellow weight loss patients. Co-hosting the demonstration with him is Jana Wolff, RD, LDN, Director of Nutrition for GBMC’s Comprehensive Obesity Management Program, where Michael was treated.

The recipe is appropriate for bariatric patients, but it is also a great high-protein, low-carb meal for anyone! Fresh feta cheese is a good source of protein. Higher in calcium and B vitamins than other cheeses, it has less fat and calories than cheddar and Parmesan. Black Kalamata olives are naturally high in sodium, but are also full of healthy fats, antioxidants, vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as calcium and iron. Red wine vinegar is a low-calorie, low-fat option often used in salad dressings and marinades. While it contains only a trace amounts of nutrients, it provides full flavor without the calories.

Please tune in to GBMC’s Facebook page on Tuesday, May 23 at 6pm for another live cooking demonstration with Michael and Jana!

Ingredients

4 oz grilled flank steak
1 oz red wine vinegar
2 oz mixed greens
1 oz feta cheese, crumbled
3-4 Kalamata or black olives
2-3 thinly sliced red onions
2-3 cherry tomatoes

Instructions

Flank steak
  1. Remove the flank steak from the refrigerator 15 minutes prior to cooking. Season both sides with extra virgin olive oil, Kosher salt and black pepper.
  2. Place a cast iron skillet on a medium high heat for 3 minutes.
  3. Gently place steak in the hot pan. You should hear a sizzle when it touches the pan.
  4. Cook the steak for 3 minutes on each side for medium rare. If you would like your steak a higher temperature, place it in a 350F oven.
  5. Remove from the pan and place on a cutting board. Allow steak to rest for 2 minutes before cutting it on a 45-degree angle against the grain.
Red Wine Vinaigrette
  1. Pour 1 oz. of red wine vinegar into a stainless steel mixing bowl
  2. Slowly whisk in 3 oz. of extra virgin olive oil. Slow and steady is the key.
  3. Season with salt and pepper
Greek Salad
  1. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl.
  2. Lightly coat with red wine vinaigrette and toss the salad.
  3. Season the salad with salt and pepper.
Plating
  1. Place the Greek salad on a small salad plate and top with flank steak.
  2. Serve immediately to your excited guests!
Nutrition Information

Recipe yields 1 serving

Calories: 332
Total Fat: 17g
Saturated Fat: 7g
Cholesterol: 95mg
Sodium: 719mg
Protein: 31g
Carbohydrate: 9g


Recipe courtesy of Michael Salamon, The Sleeved Chef.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Planning for the Unthinkable

Take Time to Make Your Wishes Known

It’s difficult to imagine, but try to picture yourself near the end of your life. An assortment of beeping devices and medications are the only things keeping you alive and doctors have told your family it’s not likely you’ll recover. Understandably distraught, your son and daughter have differing ideas of how to care for you. Your son is hopeful that something will change over the next few weeks – perhaps a different combination of medicines will bring back his mom. But your daughter feels that, even if your life could be prolonged, it wouldn’t be a quality one. You’d be confined to a hospital bed, connected to tubes, unable to care for yourself or communicate, and she believes you wouldn’t want to exist that way. The two of them disagree so strongly that they’re unable to be in the same room together. If you were awake, you would hate to see them divided like this. They used to be so close! If you had known how bitter they would become about your care, about the rift it would cause in your family, you would have made time years ago to tell them what you wanted your death to be like.

Scenarios like this play out in hospitals across the country more often than you might think. Discussing death is uncomfortable, both for the person contemplating his or her own mortality and the family members who don’t want to consider a life without their loved one. It’s no surprise that families tend to avoid talking about end-of-life care, but not discussing it might prove to be just as difficult.

In honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day, which took place on April 16, GBMC HealthCare wants to encourage all members of the community (regardless of age or health) to put the discomfort aside, complete an advance care directive, and name a healthcare agent.

Advance care directives are legal forms that ensure patients’ wishes for healthcare are followed in the event they are unable to speak for themselves due to illness or injury. Although these forms are not wills, they provide peace of mind to patients and relieve their loved ones from the burden of having to make difficult decisions during a health crisis. They also ensure that patients will have the right mix of treatments and support available at each stage of their illness.

A healthcare agent is a person, typically a trusted friend or family member, who will speak for you and make decisions based on what you would want done or your best interests if you cannot. He or she has a copy of your advanced directive, or knows where to find it. You decide who your agent is and how much power your agent will have to make these decisions.

A primary care physician is a great person to speak with about completing an advance directive and naming a healthcare agent. He or she will answer any questions you may have, direct you to appropriate resources that will help guide you through the process and ultimately, add your completed directive to your medical record.

If you already have an advance directive form, it’s very important to share it with your primary care team and any specialty physicians who may be treating you. Please remember to bring a copy to your next appointment. If you don’t have a primary care physician, visit www.mygbmcdoctor.com to find one who is right for you.

We Have Baltimore’s Best

Sarah Whiteford, MD

Better health and better care for our community. Our commitment to the neighborhoods we serve is echoed through the work our primary care teams do each day. Providing health education, guidance and patient-centered, evidence-based care to individuals and families across the region, we are here to help our patients take charge of their health and serve them throughout their lifetimes.

GBMC is honored to have Baltimore put their trust in us and we congratulate Dr. Sarah Whiteford for being named Best Family Physician in The Baltimore Sun’s Best of Baltimore Readers’ Choice poll.